A Genealogy of the Barnum, Barnam and Barnham Family

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A One-Name Study for the BARNUM/BARNHAM Surname



Notes for Sirenus Jacob MINER


He is FindAGrave memorial #86758397 and is linked to his daughter Eva.

From†The History of Rock County, Wisconsin: Its Early Settlement, Growth, Development, Resources, Etc., Western historical Company, 1879:S. J. Miner, farmer, Sec. 9; P. O. Shopiere; born in Lancaster, Erie Co., N. Y., Nov. 9, 1832; son of Jacob B. Miner, a farmer on the Holland Purchase; was of old German stock, and died at the age of 71. His father was a soldier in the Revolutionary War. Mr. S. J. Miner has now in his possession an iron bake-kettle, which was the first one used by white folks in Herkimer Co., N. Y. Mr. Miner went to Chicago in the fall of 1836, and was among the first settlers. Was there when Stone was executed, the first man hanged in Chicago. He sailed on the lake seven years, and was on the Illinois Canal several years. Among the early settlers in Chicago at the time Mr. Miner went there, were Wentworth, Hubbard and Sherman; Steel was Sheriff at that time. He came to Wisconsin in 1850, to Jefferson Prairie, town of Bradford, and settled on 161 acres; was there till 1878. Then, in March, went to Turtle, and bought 59 acres. He married Elizabeth Barnum, daughter of George N. Barnum, of Walworth Co., June 23, 1859. Have had six childrenóDora (living at home); Katie (married Mr. Lawrence, and is living in Turtle), Nettie J. and George (going to school), Frances and Eva Irene (at home). Mr. Miner rode on that first car that ran on West Madison Street, Chicago. There was a blacksmith-shop on the corner of Randolph and Clark streets when Mr. Miner first went to Chicago.

Sirenus is buried on a 4-grave lot in the Ord Cemetery, Ord, Nebraska. His marker is a large, red boulder. Next to him are buried his daughter Eva and her husband Robert Gray. The one remaining grave on the lot was offered by Eva to her niece, Jane Bell, who was buried there.
He is FindAGrave memorial #86758397 and is linked to his daughter Eva.

From†The History of Rock County, Wisconsin: Its Early Settlement, Growth, Development, Resources, Etc., Western Historical Company, 1879: S. J. Miner, farmer, Sec. 9; P. O. Shopiere; born in Lancaster, Erie Co., N. Y., Nov. 9, 1832; son of Jacob B. Miner, a farmer on the Holland Purchase; was of old German stock, and died at the age of 71. His father was a soldier in the Revolutionary War. Mr. S. J. Miner has now in his possession an iron bake-kettle, which was the first one used by white folks in Herkimer Co., N. Y. Mr. Miner went to Chicago in the fall of 1836, and was among the first settlers. Was there when Stone was executed, the first man hanged in Chicago. He sailed on the lake seven years, and was on the Illinois Canal several years. Among the early settlers in Chicago at the time Mr. Miner went there, were Wentworth, Hubbard and Sherman; Steel was Sheriff at that time. He came to Wisconsin in 1850, to Jefferson Prairie, town of Bradford, and settled on 161 acres; was there till 1878. Then, in March, went to Turtle, and bought 59 acres. He married Elizabeth Barnum, daughter of George N. Barnum, of Walworth Co., June 23, 1859. Have had six childrenóDora (living at home); Katie (married Mr. Lawrence, and is living in Turtle), Nettie J. and George (going to school), Frances and Eva Irene (at home). Mr. Miner rode on that first car that ran on West Madison Street, Chicago. There was a blacksmith-shop on the corner of Randolph and Clark streets when Mr. Miner first went to Chicago.
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